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Common Racing Fears and How to Overcome Them


A lot of us have toed the start line of a race and think, “What did I get myself into.” Sometimes, we brush off our racing fears, and other times we let it consume us.

Here is one of my experiences —

For a while it was my dream to race a triathlon, but I had one major set back… I didn’t know how to swim. I was 18 years old and couldn’t even float in a pool. Swimming was just something I had never learned how to do and to be honest, I didn’t even know where to start. One day, I just started going to the pool with my family, because 2016 was going to be the year I did a triathlon. You always hear people saying, “Go big or go home,” so I went big and signed up for a half Iron Man.

I spent that whole winter and summer training. I bought my first wet suit, my first bike helmet, etc. I was a total newbie, but I was determined and I did all the training. By the time race day came along the corner I was ready, or so I thought. Keep in mind that this was my first trialon, and I chose a half Iron Man. On race day, I toed the start line for the swim and immediately let intimidation take over. The wave that day were huge, the race was technically wetsuit illegal, and I was the youngest one in the crowd. I had just turned 19 earlier that month and I felt like I was making a huge mistake since I not as experienced as everyone around me. Less than a quarter of the way into the swim I panicked. It just so happened that the swimmer next to me was also panicking and she pulled me to the nearest kayaker. I was pulled out of the water and received my first DNF (Did not finish).

To say I was devastated was an understatement. But at the same time I was so thankful for the experience. It made me a better and stronger athlete, and it not only reminded me to stay humble when it comes to big races, but it was a reminder that I have to have faith in myself. This is what I look away from that day …

 

  • Trust your training

 

HAVE TRUST IN YOUR TRAINING. You just spend 4+ months preparing and training for your big race, don’t doubt yourself now. Even if you didn’t train to your fullest capabilities or missed a couple long runs, don’t sweat it. Think about the runs you DID do verus the runs you didn’t do.

 

  • Know that you’re capable and your dreams are obtainable

 

The human body is capable of amazing things, so never underestimate what you can accomplish. People run marathons, do crossfit, race in triathlons, etc. and that is just some things our bodies are capable of! Recognize that what you are doing is not only amazing, but also recognize that it is coming from your capabilities. Don’t ever think your dreams are too big or too far out of reach. The moment you start putting limitations on what you think you can and can’t do is the moment you start losing faith in yourself and your capabilities.

 

  • Tell that negative voice in your head to get lost

 

If you tell yourself you’re not going to get it done, chances are you won’t. You need to turn your can’t into can. When I DNF’d my first IronMan 70.3, I toed that start line already setting myself up for failure because in my head I was saying, “I can’t.” And if people around you are the ones telling you that you can’t, don’t listen to them! YOU know your body and your capabilities better than anyone else. Have faith in yourself that you DO have what it takes.

Just breath… you got this.

–Ruby

 

Common Racing Fears and How to Overcome Them

A lot of us have toed the start line of a race and think, “What did I get myself into.” Sometimes, we brush off our racing fears, and other times we let it consume us.

Here is one of my experiences —

For a while it was my dream to race a triathlon, but I had one major set back… I didn’t know how to swim. I was 18 years old and couldn’t even float in a pool. Swimming was just something I had never learned how to do and to be honest, I didn’t even know where to start. One day, I just started going to the pool with my family, because 2016 was going to be the year I did a triathlon. You always hear people saying, “Go big or go home,” so I went big and signed up for a half Iron Man.

I spent that whole winter and summer training. I bought my first wet suit, my first bike helmet, etc. I was a total newbie, but I was determined and I did all the training. By the time race day came along the corner I was ready, or so I thought. Keep in mind that this was my first trialon, and I chose a half Iron Man. On race day, I toed the start line for the swim and immediately let intimidation take over. The wave that day were huge, the race was technically wetsuit illegal, and I was the youngest one in the crowd. I had just turned 19 earlier that month and I felt like I was making a huge mistake since I not as experienced as everyone around me. Less than a quarter of the way into the swim I panicked. It just so happened that the swimmer next to me was also panicking and she pulled me to the nearest kayaker. I was pulled out of the water and received my first DNF (Did not finish).

To say I was devastated was an understatement. But at the same time I was so thankful for the experience. It made me a better and stronger athlete, and it not only reminded me to stay humble when it comes to big races, but it was a reminder that I have to have faith in myself. This is what I look away from that day …

 

  • Trust your training

 

HAVE TRUST IN YOUR TRAINING. You just spend 4+ months preparing and training for your big race, don’t doubt yourself now. Even if you didn’t train to your fullest capabilities or missed a couple long runs, don’t sweat it. Think about the runs you DID do verus the runs you didn’t do.

 

  • Know that you’re capable and your dreams are obtainable

 

The human body is capable of amazing things, so never underestimate what you can accomplish. People run marathons, do crossfit, race in triathlons, etc. and that is just some things our bodies are capable of! Recognize that what you are doing is not only amazing, but also recognize that it is coming from your capabilities. Don’t ever think your dreams are too big or too far out of reach. The moment you start putting limitations on what you think you can and can’t do is the moment you start losing faith in yourself and your capabilities.

 

  • Tell that negative voice in your head to get lost

 

If you tell yourself you’re not going to get it done, chances are you won’t. You need to turn your can’t into can. When I DNF’d my first IronMan 70.3, I toed that start line already setting myself up for failure because in my head I was saying, “I can’t.” And if people around you are the ones telling you that you can’t, don’t listen to them! YOU know your body and your capabilities better than anyone else. Have faith in yourself that you DO have what it takes.

Just breath… you got this.

–Ruby

 

Common Racing Fears and How to Overcome Them